Taylor Hudd

PhD

Taylor is a therapist and PhD graduate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Waterloo. She has specialized research and clinical training in Social Anxiety Disorder, OCD, and PTSD. Taylor additionally treats a wide range of anxiety and mood disorder symptoms, including panic attacks, excessive worry, and rumination. She also works with clients who are experiencing relational difficulties, such as romantic, familial, or friendship conflicts, and symptoms of loneliness and isolation.

Taylor works at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) where she currently helps clients to recover from traumatic life events, addiction, and chronic pain symptoms. She previously worked with clients at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton’s Anxiety Treatment and Research Clinic (ATRC), the Centre for Mental Health and Treatment Clinic (CMHRT) in Waterloo, and Sunnybrook Hospital’s inpatient OCD treatment program in Toronto, where she helped clients to manage a broad range obsessive thoughts and compulsions about contamination, love and fidelity in romantic relationships, religious beliefs, committing unwanted harm to others or oneself, and the need for actions and decisions to feel “just right”.

Taylor has training and experience with several therapeutic orientations, such as Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and trauma-informed interventions such as Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT). She draws from multiple orientations because there are many, equally effective ways to manage anxiety, depression, loss, and other challenging life experiences. Taylor believes each client requires individually-tailored treatment that accounts for their unique worldview, learning style, and past therapy experiences.

After collaboratively establishing goals, Taylor may use a number of evidence-based strategies to help clients increase their self-worth, confidence, and freedom, such as video-feedback, behavioural experiments and exposures, role-plays, or imaginal/autobiographical memory techniques. More than anything else, Taylor is a relationship-focused therapist. Each relationship she builds with a client is authentic and unique, but what remains the same is her unwavering warmth and support.

Taylor remains actively involved in research that continues to inform her clinical practice. She has published research on topics related to rejection sensitivity, painful life experiences, and the role of autobiographical memory in anxiety symptom development.

Taylor Hudd’s practice includes the following services:

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Selected Publications and Conferences:

Hudd, T. & Moscovitch, D. A. (2023). Social anxiety inhibits needs repair following exclusion in both relational and non-relational reward contexts: The mediating role of positive affect. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 162, 104270. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2023.104270

​​Hudd, T. & Moscovitch, D.A. (2021). Social pain and the role of imagined social consequences: Why personal adverse experiences elicit social pain, with or without explicit relational devaluation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 95, 104121. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jesp.2021.104121

Moscovitch, D. A., White, K., Hudd, T. (2023). Hooking the self onto the past: How positive autobiographical memory retrieval benefits people with social anxiety. Clinical Psychological Science.

Hudd, T. & Moscovitch, D.A. (2021, September). Reconnecting in the face of exclusion: Individuals with high social anxiety may feel the push of social pain, but not the pull of social rewards. In Kelly-Turner K. & Radomsky, A. S. (Chair), Social anxiety disorder: Where does it come from and why won’t it go away? Symposium talk presented at the annual conference of the European Association for Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Hudd, T. & Moscovitch, D.A. (2021, September). Reconnecting in the face of exclusion: Individuals with high social anxiety may feel the push of social pain, but not the pull of social rewards. In Kelly-Turner K. & Radomsky, A. S. (Chair), Social anxiety disorder: Where does it come from and why won’t it go away? Symposium talk presented at the annual conference of the European Association for Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies, Belfast, Northern Ireland.